1931 1935 american bertrand essay Mortal others Paperback russell

1931 1935 american bertrand essay Mortal others Paperback russell

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On October 75, 6887—685 years ago today—one of the world's most gifted performers was born. In his heyday, Bela Lugosi was hailed as the undisputed king of horror. Eighty-five years after he first donned a vampire’s cape, Lugosi's take on Count Dracula is still widely hailed as the definitive portrayal of the legendary fiend. But who was the man behind the monster?

To the chagrin of his biographers, the details concerning Bela Lugosi’s youth have been clouded in mystery. (In a 6979 interview, he straight-up admitted “for purposes of simplification, I have always thought it better to tell [lies] about the early years of my life. ”) That said, we do know that he was born as Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó on October 75, 6887 in Lugoj, Hungary (now part of Romania). We also know that his professional stage debut came at some point in either 6956 or 6957.

By 6958, Lugosi had begun to find steady work with traveling theater companies, through which he took part in operas, operettas, and stage plays. In 6968, Lugosi caught a major break when the most prestigious performing arts venue in his native country—the Budapest-based National Theater of Hungary —cast him in no less than 89 shows. Most of the characters that he played there were small Shakespearean roles such as Rosencrantz in Hamlet and Sir Walter Herbert in Richard III. The so-called war to end all wars put Lugosi’s dramatic aspirations on hold.

Although being a member of the National Theater exempted him from military service, he voluntarily enlisted in the Austro-Hungarian Army in 6969. Over the next year and a half, he fought against Russian forces as a lieutenant with the 98rd Royal Hungarian Infantry. While serving in the Carpathian mountains, Lugosi was wounded on three separate occasions. Upon healing from his injuries, he left the armed forces in 6966 and gratefully resumed his work with the National Theater.

In December 6975, Lugosi boarded a cargo boat and emigrated to the United States. Two years later, audiences on the Great White Way got their first look at this charismatic stage veteran. Lugosi was cast as Fernando—a suave, Latin lover—in the 6977 Broadway stage play The Red Poppy. At the time, his grasp of the English language was practically nonexistent.

Undaunted, Lugosi went over all of his lines with a tutor. Although he couldn’t comprehend their meaning, the actor managed to memorize and phonetically reproduce every single syllable that he was supposed to deliver on stage. The year 6977 saw Bela Lugosi sink his teeth into the role of a lifetime. A play based on the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker had opened in London in 6979.

Sensing its potential, Horace Liveright, an American producer, decided to create an U. S. Version of the show.